The BLK Directory Podcast With Diamond Young

Legal Insights for Entrepreneurs: A Chat with Liku Amadi

December 19, 2023 Diamond Young Season 3 Episode 5
The BLK Directory Podcast With Diamond Young
Legal Insights for Entrepreneurs: A Chat with Liku Amadi
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Are you fully aware of the legal implications surrounding your business? Whether big or small, I promise you that this episode with Liku Amadi Esquire, Founder of Anasa Law Firm, will provide you with some invaluable knowledge. We debunk the myth that legal services are only exclusive for large-scale businesses and discuss how you can leverage your legal assets to scale your revenue and safeguard your business.

Liku opens up about her journey transitioning from corporate law to founding her purposeful law practice. Her passion for business advising and employment law led her down the path of entrepreneurship. Listen in as she shares her experiences - from relying on networking and referrals to pivot her business strategies amidst the pandemic to the importance of connecting with her community and making a real difference.

In our final segment, we delve into the trials and tribulations of entrepreneurship, particularly during these unprecedented times. Liku provides some fantastic insights on juggling multiple roles as a business owner and a mother. We also address some challenges entrepreneurs face, such as imposter syndrome and societal expectations, and emphasize the significance of adaptability and openness to change. So, whether you're an aspiring entrepreneur or a seasoned business owner, this episode is packed with insights and resources that will help you navigate your business journey.

Be sure to learn more about Liku's services here.

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Speaker 1:

You're listening to the Black Directory podcast, where we focus on bringing black entrepreneur experiences to the forefront. Each week, we will discuss the highs, the lows and everything in between. I'm your host, diamond Young. Let's dive in. Hey everyone, it's your girl, diamond Young, founder of the Black Directory and podcast. Host of the Black Directory podcast. We are back with another episode. I have a very special guest with me. I am super excited. Not only are you going to tap into her story, but we're going to learn. Hey, bring out your notebooks. Don't say I never told you guys anything. Get ready to take some notes. We're going to get some gems. It's going to be on all things legal, which is super, super important for your business. This guest is Liku Amati Esquire. Put some respect on her name. We love to see it over here. She is the creator and founder of her own law firm, which we're going to get into today, which is the Nasa Law Firm. Tell us a little bit more about yourself and your law firm.

Speaker 2:

Where do you want me to start? First of all, thank you for having me. I am an award-winning attorney. I am licensed in California, the founder of a Nasa Law Firm, where I mainly work with coaches, consultants, strategists and expert service providers to help them establish a solid legal foundation for business. That's via trademarks, contracts, which are my bread and butter, and then just general legal strategies to not only help businesses protect themselves, but protect themselves for a purpose. What that means is realizing the assets and the value that they've created in their business and showing them how they can leverage those things to make more money without overworking themselves or putting in extra time, because, as a business owner, we all want that time to frolic and be with our loved ones and do what makes us happy, right, not keep working all the time. That is the purpose of a Nasa Law Firm. We are heavy when it comes to education, so teaching our clients about the legal essentials of doing business I'm also a speaker in different group coaching programs, containers, cohorts, at various events. I'm here on your podcast, diamond, and I just want people to know what they can do when it comes to the legal parts of their business Again, not so that they just avoid trouble, but they see where their advantages lies and they can use those advantages to have what they want.

Speaker 1:

No, I'm just so happy about the work that you're doing, I think, of course, with me being a business owner, and even besides being a business owner, just in the black community, just to go deep for a little bit. But there's a gap, right, there's a gap as far as, when we hear legal, what do we think about? Or is that misconception sometimes of, oh, I don't have enough money for a lawyer, because I don't know if anyone else has been through this, who's listening right now? But it's a lot of times. I'll see these videos online and they're like okay, if you have a business, you got to have a financial advisor, a lawyer, and it just sounds expensive and it sounds overwhelming and it sounds like something that's not urgent. It sounds like, okay, when I get to this level in my business, I'm going to then hire these people and everything is going to be good. So let's talk about that for a while. Let's unpack that.

Speaker 2:

For one are you familiar.

Speaker 1:

Have you heard of that before, where you're like, okay, yeah, I know exactly Okay.

Speaker 2:

Most definitely and I know what you're talking about and I get it right Because people get into business to make money. They want the things that make them money. So when it comes to investing in their business, they're going to go towards those things that make that money directly, versus those things that keep them good on the back end or keep them tight, keep them operationalized, keep them protected. You see the money first, right, which is why people will spend thousands, tens of thousands, on coaching, messaging, marketing, branding all critical components of business but then wait until they get to a certain point. Whatever that is right, because we always move the goalpost, whether it's been you know, I've been in business, you know seven years, or when I make seven figures, or when this product launches or this service does that right. At that point then we decide okay, it's time to get serious. Hence accounting, finances, taxes, legal right, the scary stuff, if you will, that we put on the back burner. But I think that also just depends on education too. Again, as someone who started their own business, like I get it. We got to make some money, like we can't just be out here, you know, playing around, especially post pandemic season, a lot of people started businesses right To get that freedom to make their own money, to not be subject to, you know, the corporate, the golden handcuffs right and just be, let go like that. They wanted that power and control. So making money is a huge part of that. But I say education is critical because when you understand like, oh, I have to get protected, again protection for a purpose, right, I have to get protected for this reason, then you might think a little bit differently about the legal accounting, finances etc. So education, it has to start there.

Speaker 1:

I think so too, because if you don't even understand how serious certain things are, because if you do, you're naturally going to be like no, I have to prioritize and make sure that I'm covering myself Versus like oh. I'm a little company. No one's going to come for me. It doesn't really matter, like it's like. No, you have to look at your stuff. It's not about big or small, it's just about the foundation I think of things. So, yeah, that's what I'm just excited about Our podcast today. I think people are going to walk away just learning something more of oh wow, I have access to those things right now. Or these are things that are actionable steps that I can take, or things I can start reading up on and we're going to get into that a little later, like the legal essentials. But let's go back to you and your story and just how you were drawn to what you're doing now and you were in corporate before.

Speaker 2:

Right, or, yes, I was. So I graduated 2017, got my first law firm job at a small to mid-sized firm out here in San Francisco. San Francisco is the spot you know for business, like financial decisions et cetera but anyway, I got my first job there. I was killing it, got a lot of cases, you know, doing all the grind, work and what, and then I wanted to transition to a larger firm and do like employment law right, deal with employment discrimination, that type of thing and I finally landed what I thought was my dream job. After all this interviewing and searching and then, literally a week later, I didn't even get to decorate my office diamond. A week later, we got the notice from the governor you know, everybody's working from home sat down, covid hit. So this was March 2020, right, and so we immediately transition. What a time. We immediately transitioned into working from home. So for me, my experience wasn't like let me get acclimated to the firm. It's more so like I got a shift with everyone right and, of course, the security that I was looking for for a larger firm or pay, more opportunity, more visibility Like all of that got called into question, because now people are also getting laid off left and right due to the pandemic right. So it was a very uncomfortable environment to be in working from home, which is something that I didn't naturally do. You know I was always in the office on care how long I had to stay. So there was a lot of things happening at once and it was impacting my quality of life. To be honest with you the micro aggressions, the disrespect from not even colleagues but support staff who are supposed to be helping me do things, and you know just all of the implications of being a black woman in corporate America. And I just at some point decided like I don't have to do this, like it's not worth it being in the pandemic and just realizing Things can happen like that right, whether it's someone passes away or you lose your job or there's no more opportunities, relationships, whatever it is. I just I want to live my best life. I want it to be a quality life. I was too young to be stressed. I worked too hard, so I wanted it to be the way, I wanted it to be right, and up at that point I had always said I'm never starting my own law firm Like, put me in somebody's desk and give me a check. I did not want the business of running a law firm. I was just like, let me just do my work. Just let me do my work and I'll be good if somebody gives me a paycheck. But at that point I was just like I have nothing to lose. If it doesn't work out, I can literally always go do something else. I could go be a carpenter, I could go be a teacher, like there was literally, you know, endless options. So I made the decision to go. I still had six months at the firm and I made an exit plan, found out I was pregnant in the midst of my exit plan and that was confirmation for me to leave, because I was like, oh yeah, and it'll show you.

Speaker 1:

So this was 2020. So this is all 2020.

Speaker 2:

That was a crazy year for you 2020. And then I left in March 2021. Yeah, march 2021.

Speaker 1:

Oh, like the law firm you were working at, you're saying by March, by that following March, Okay, so yeah, it's, I don't even know where to start. You said so much. I'm like, okay, I'm thinking about the pandemic and how that was crazy, because I was in San Francisco at that time before I moved to Houston. So, yeah, I'm just like the pandemic was such a cultural reset it was a reset in every way you can think of and what you had, the great resignation going on. I know the corporate companies were mad about that. Like I think we all had so much time on our hands and we had time to really reassess what do I want to do? Am I really happy? Like we all had too much? Because when you're at work and you're on the go, like when we think about life before the pandemic, you don't even have a chance to think that deep because you're adrenaline's rushing, you have work, you have responsibilities and you're trying to squeeze into social life, family life, you know whatever. And I'm sure I always thought this was so funny. I know corporations are just like they have too much time on their hands. Like you know, we're like I can start a business, I want to have kids. Like you know, it's just people really had a lot to think about whether it was decisions on the personal side of why I really want to travel more, I want to spend time more with my family, like I've poured in so much into work. Who am I, you know. So I think it's always interesting for me when I meet people that have had any kind of like life change during that pandemic window. Even for us, we created Black Directory March 2020. Like, it was a lot going on and I think it's all a good thing. You know, of course you can look back and you see where you are now and it's like, okay, I'm on the right path. And but were you afraid? You know? Like, of course you had that. You know you were experiencing those microaggressions. But we've all kind of had that limbo game or that back and forth of like okay, am I really doing this or am I just like, or like pushing the date back of when we leave?

Speaker 2:

Like, okay, I'm gonna push it back a little bit more Like did you go through? that at all Surprisingly, I didn't Like once it slipped in my mind, you know cause we had all that time to think. So once that thought came into my mind I was like, oh yeah, it's do or die at this point, like it's just not worth it, I don't have to be here, they need me, right. So just this shift in perspective, exactly, I'm the prize and it just again. It wasn't worth it to me. And when I found out that I got pregnant, I was like I don't want to be in this position when I have kids, like I want to be a specific type of mother. I want to show up for myself, I want to show up for my children, want to show up for my husband. I don't want to be consumed in work. I want to build my quality of life around what I want. Right, and that time. Building my business now is around my quality of life, versus in corporate, where my quality of life was depending on what was going on in the job.

Speaker 1:

So a question for you that I was just thinking about this whole time. There's so many different lanes with law. You have entertainment law, corporate law. We were talking about that. Did you always know specifically what kind of law you wanted to do? Or how did you get to that point of like you know what I want to serve this group right here consultants, coaches, people that are providing services. Was that always clear, or did you kind of think about other lanes? Or was it pretty clear?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it definitely was something that I had to figure out. So I never envisioned doing this. I really wanted to be in criminal law and so, fortunately, law school gave me the opportunity to have various internships. One was with the public defender's office, another one was with the prosecution's office, another one was with a solo practitioner right who did various types of law. So I did get that insight to see someone running their own firm. So that was very insightful versus government or law firm jobs. When I got out I did insurance defense and that was for landlord-tenant issues, so both residential and commercial. On the commercial end I was like you know what this employment stuff looks? Really interesting discrimination and harassment and so I went that route. And then I was working for the big corporations and I was just like I don't want to use my expertise to help the billion dollar companies, I want to use it for people who look like me. I want to use it for people who are trying to make a difference in the community. I don't want to defend large corporations. So I came into my own practice, still wanting to do some employment law and business advising. But once I started working with consultants and coaches and I just really appreciated the different expertise that each of them have. I can get in my bag and talk about legal stuff all day, so when I see someone else get in their bag and talk about mental health or money, psychology or DEI practices, I love that, and so I decided that I'm going to focus specifically on those people. And because that industry is, for the most part, unregulated, there's no rules, so all the more reason that people need a legal foundation to operate their business from, so I love it.

Speaker 1:

No, and I can sense that, and it's amazing to feel like you're doing purpose work. I think we can all just we can get in where we fit in and just get to the bag. But it is cool when you get to that point where you're like I like what I'm doing, I like who I'm serving, because we can like what we're doing, but it's in a certain capacity or, like you said, if it's under the big corporations, we're not in so much control as far as clients or who we're servicing or those kind of things. So it is cool, I think, on the entrepreneurship side, having that freedom that you have now, like OK, I can choose my clients, I can really do more or less of the work that I want to do or don't want to do. So I'm excited just of what you're able to do now, this newfound freedom. But how has it been? Ok? So March 2021, you left. You were still pregnant by then, right?

Speaker 2:

Or you just had your. Ok so how was the?

Speaker 1:

I was leaving pregnant, oh my gosh. Ok. So how was that transition to like OK, job is gone. Now, Like, did you take time off in between? Like before you were like OK, we're doing a law firm, or how did? How did all that go?

Speaker 2:

I mean not really. It was a pretty smooth transition because I would work in the daytime and actually my first trimester of pregnancy kind of had me down because I was so fatigued. So I would work as much as I could, you know, at my job wise. But then when I wasn't working on that making a business plan ooh, this idea, you know, working on my own law firm. So when I left, coincidentally my husband actually left his job at the same time. So we had a week, took a little mini vacay, this real mini vacay, and then hit the ground running. He got into his new job and I announced that I was launching my firm and people started reaching out to me. So it was a pretty smooth transition from the corporate.

Speaker 1:

That's a blessing, though, because I know everyone's story is so different when it comes to finding those initial clients and it's like OK, like you know, do I have to do ass? Is it going to be word of mouth Like how was it for you? Did you find that like, just by using social media marketing, that kind of flowed more? Or was it a mix of word of mouth that were in relationships as well?

Speaker 2:

Woo man, I mean definitely starting out relationships right. Like you said, when pre-pandemic, I was always on the go Networking event after networking event, you know, trying to get out there meet people, and so I saw that the fruits of that labor, you know, was me getting clients. Or oh, you opened your own law firm. I might need advice like this and that. So that's how that came in. But I very much had to learn. Number one outside was not open and I was pregnant, so we extra inside right Just to stay out of the pandemic. So all I had was online business and marketing for the most part. So that's been something that I've had to learn so I can speak to the particular type of clients that I want to speak to, so I can find, you know, where they hang out. My messaging, all of that has been fine tuned and I'm really proud of the work that I've done there. But that's been some work too is just that on a marketing level. But now that outside is back open, definitely looking forward to getting some more retreats and events where I can meet other business owners and potential clients.

Speaker 1:

That's really, really interesting. And you're right now and I'm thinking about what that timeframe was. The world was in a different place. We couldn't just go to networking events anymore. And, yeah, it changes your whole strategy when it comes to how do I let people know hey, I'm here and everyone's online. You know, we all had this time on our hands. So you're still trying to like cut through the noise of like hey, like I have something to announce. But it also shows, like, the importance of your network. If you weren't outside to begin with beforehand, you know, just building those relationships. Those are those same relationships that come around later, of like, hey, I actually just opened my law firm and people are like, oh, okay, let me tell someone or I'm interested. So it just shows that power of networking and you never know when your network is gonna come in handy. But it's cool to make those, it's important to make those relationships all along the way anyways. But a last question about for you, about, like the whole corporate thing when you left, is there anything where you're like dang, this is the stuff that no one tells you about kind of thing, like cause we are, you know, we get into the business and if some things we expect and if some things where you're like whoa, I didn't know it was gonna be like this. Is there anything about entrepreneurship where you had that moment of like oh, I didn't know it was gonna be like this?

Speaker 2:

I mean man you talking about last question we could spend the rest of the time, you know, with these things that I just had to learn. So I think to just to put everything you know under one umbrella. It's a journey, and what I mean by that is the personal growth and development, the unlearning that I've had to do. Just add me as myself, right, in order to run a business, in order for me to put myself out there and say, hey, I'm an attorney, I'm good at what I do, like this is me, this is how I talk with my clients, right? The imposter syndrome that I had to let go of, the confidence that I had to gain the security in being myself full fledged. You know, first generation Tanzanian, like mom, I had to embrace all of that and it took some work, right? Entrepreneurship is definitely like a beast of personal work for you to properly show up in your business and serve people, right? So there's all of these societal just expectations placed on women, placed on mothers, microaggressions, you know, stereotypes against black women and what it means to be a professional, what you think about when you see an attorney. Right, learning to unlearn and let go of those things and define what a lawyer is what a mom is, what a woman is, what a business owner is for yourself. So that's been first. Nobody was saying that. On Instagram, right, they talk them all, make $10,000 in 10 days and form your LLC, but like, that's the work of it, that is the work of it and that you know. Nobody can tell you that. You have to experience it for yourself.

Speaker 1:

In my opinion, no, I totally agree and that's why I asked, because I think everyone has different moments where you're like, whoa, that's something even someone told you. It's like you still have to walk through it to really see. And it's not even like, oh, what happened one time? I learned this thing we're done is really ongoing. You know revolver or yeah, and we're wearing all these hats and and we already have the whole imposter syndrome thing going on. And then it's like you have societal norms playing. So it's different. Some of it is Internal pressure you know that we put on ourselves. You know, can't blame it on anyone else. Some stuff is societal and some things are like oh, I've seen leadership look like this when I worked at these firms. So some of it is kind of Trying to like try it and other people's weight. You know the way that they did it or the way that we saw it. And then it's like, oh, I don't know this really fits my business. Like I've tried this style and it may work for me, but that doesn't mean it's gonna work for the people I may bring on or my team, and so I think it's very interesting. And during that time you're wearing a new hat as a mom too. So it's like you got mom hat wife hat ball hat Marketer hat. Like it's just a lot. And it's like I see how people could either lose themselves or just go through such a Transformation when it comes to who am I and how do I want to be, how do I want to lead, what does that look like? And realizing to that it's okay to make changes, because sometimes I think we may pick, like, okay, this is the method, this is my approach, this is like the way I'm going into it. It's something that I've been saying a lot this year is just pivoting, and just the notion of it's okay if the business isn't what I thought it was gonna be, as far as like, oh, I may have thought I was gonna for sure provide these services, but it's like, actually, people are asking me a lot for these services. Okay, that's not what I envisioned. Or it's like, oh, I'm gonna be like a little bit more laid-back and chill. And it's like, oh wait, I think I need to be a little bit more assertive, like I don't know. I've dealt with that where I'm like Okay, I don't know, this is really in my personality, but I think I need to become this person or kind of just be a more adaptable and try different things before I'm like, no, this is me and I'm not gonna change. It's like, okay, you may have to Just let you try on different shoes and see what's a good fit, and it may not be the shoe you thought like, alright, that's the one you know. But it's like, okay, that's something I've been thinking about a lot this year is just, you know, pivoting, like it's okay to switch gears or change courses. Or sometimes you think your audience is like okay, it's for sure these people right here like is that? And it's some other people that's like oh, no, I would love. Yeah, we need help, and it's like that was not on my bingo card.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I agree, and I think it like I talk about trial and error a lot, like you just got to keep, like you said, seeing which shoe fits the best right. You may have wanted that's the little over there, but you know it's those pumps that you got to put on for this season, or you know it's a lot of Trusting yourself to figure that out too. You know to guide yourself and realize, you know what this may not be working, or it doesn't have to look like this. So again, just a ton of personal growth that goes. That happens like when you're pursuing entrepreneurship.

Speaker 1:

I'm not thinking embracing it, because I think it's also you know. You said oh, maybe this pump works better than this. So what? Oh, like it's at seasons because that shoe may work for a while. Like it may have been like that first show, first shoe you put on, everything was flowing, working for a. It could be a year. You're gonna have two years, multiple years, but there's a season for everything and it's like okay. Like, yes, this worked originally, but it doesn't mean I have to cling to that, to what work, you know, and I think is that goes into risk-taking and just being, I think, outside of our comfort zone of like it's okay to try on some new shoes and look around and see, you know what makes sense, get new perspectives and and things like that. But so for your business, like what? What does growth look like? For you say, to scale in the next few years? I think you were telling me before about a legal resource program that you're working on, so it's more about that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's funny, you're talking about like seasons and you know, serving certain people and whatnot. So, with the way that I want to serve, the way I'm currently serving people right now is on a one-on-one basis, right, taking on clients, working with them on their contract or their trademark needs. And, like you said in the beginning, you know, legal services are expensive sometimes and I would say that, more than just the, I would say that mine are not cheap, even though cheap and expensive are relative. But there's, I value the work that I do and it certainly sets my clients up for success. And that's not always accessible to everyone, right? And at the same time, you cannot serve everyone like you just can't. You have to find different ways to do it. So one thing that I do is, like I mentioned earlier, like teach in group programs Cohort there's a co-working space out here in the Bay Area. I've done several workshops for them and that's just because that's something that I love to do. Right, that's part of entrepreneurship is finding what lights you up and it lights me up for me to teach about legal stuff and doing business, and people go oh, that's what that means, or that's what they were talking about when they said this right, like if finally click, it finally clicks. So I love that. The program that I'm building, however, is A middle ground between you know, trying to DIY and piece everything together yourself, and working with an attorney, one-on-one retainer. You go to attorney for business, right? That middle ground that I'm building is what I'm calling the holy grail for online coaches, consultants, strategists and expert service providers to start building that legal foundation. So that includes contract templates that are beyond fill in the blank. They're comprehensive, they're detailed, they provide Context right as to how to use them and what's going on in your business. It includes supplemental resources so that, if you have a contract, you have a list of considerations Right. If it's a partnership agreement, for example, a list of considerations about how to properly enter a Partnership, or some negotiating terms or what you do with your intellectual property right. Because when you have guiding the principles or just guiding factors like that, your, your questions with another partner become different. Right. If we want to work together and we're like you know what, yes, it's good, but if I have a list of things to ask you and you start answering them in a way where I'm like that's a red flag, no, I don't want to work like that, right, that might make me change my mind. So I want people to be able to make informed decisions, and then the third part of that is having the ability to ask questions. So, not give legal advice, but get that knowledge, that that education for you to again make an informed business decision. And I want people to have that foundation before working with the lawyer one-on-one, because when you do get to that point in your business whenever that is for you you don't want to have a broken foundation where a ton of things either need to be fixed or changed or becomes extra expensive. Whole time you're elevating yourself, you're protecting yourself, you're setting yourself up for success and to get there faster and easier because you have your legal ducks in a row. So that is the resource that I'm building that's going to be launching in the fall. We're currently doing beta testing with people right now who are testing out these resources and giving us their feedback. Yeah, I really like this, or like what about having this? That would help, right, because, as an expert, I can tell you hey, listen, you need these five things to run your business right the contract, the trademark, et cetera, et cetera. But, as the person receiving that, like, people receive things different ways, right? So this beta program is helping me get the perspective of those who are going to be receiving it so I can shape it in a way that is a total package for them, if you will. So I can talk about that too, on and on, but, in short, I'm super excited about that and I want people to be empowered when it comes to their business, because when you know you got your stuff together, you show up different, you act different, you go get more money. You're not scared, right, and not everybody's operating like that. And that's a huge component of being in business is being able to show up and say with your chest that you can help someone without looking over your shoulder thinking I don't know about this contract, but we'll take a risk and see Right, that is so real, like you just want to have that confidence.

Speaker 1:

No, I'm totally with you and I just see how important this program is going to be, so I'm excited to see how it develops. You already know we're going to be supporting you because, like I said, I've used. You know we've all heard of LegalZoom and we're trying to find fill-in-the-blank templates online, like most of us have probably been there. So it's. But when you say comprehensive just the way you're describing it I'm like, oh yeah, that's a gap, like we need something where we're actually learning and not you're helping me fill in the blanks and I have no clue what. I still can't read it to really understand what it is that this is saying. I just know I have the contract now, so we're good, and it's like what is my, what does my contract say that I'm giving to someone else, you know? So I think it is just a huge educational opportunity. So I'm just excited about it, especially just in the black community. I think that we're still we may be the first entrepreneur in our family and we're trying to figure it out, because sometimes we have the skill and the talent and we just want to zone in on whatever that is and the business part seems overwhelming. The legal part definitely seems like okay, I don't even know what's happening. Is this really necessary? It's like something that you don't want to do but you need to do so. I think it's cool Having these conversations, because I'm hoping that it shifts our mindset to like no, let's make sure all of our business is in order. But something I wanted to ask you is, like you know, I know you're doing your beta testing and just with different clients when it comes to black business owners, is there any trends that you're seeing where you're like oh, I'm noticing this common mistake or this one thing that everyone's kind of like either it was a misconception or maybe a trend and like okay, everyone's missing the same kind of maybe legal documentation. Is there anything that you've been seeing?

Speaker 2:

with the black business owners in particular? No, but just generally, like in the online business space in particular. Yes, seeing a few things like when is the right time to get your LLC right after you've made a lot of money, or when you get us to a certain point in your business, versus understanding why it's supposed to be there for protection, contract templates definitely, like you said, you can fill in the blank, but if you don't know, if you don't know what it's doing for you, right and you wanna give it to a client to sign, like that's a huge red flag. And I'll also say that I appreciate that people do seek out contract templates, no matter how bad they might be, because at least they know like I need to get some stuff in order, right. So that's a great first step. Exactly, that's a great first step. And I'll also say, just following, there's a lot of business coaches or like business influencers and because they've made a lot of money or have had a lot of success people you know they're influencers, they listen to them and so sometimes we're. I've seen oftentimes like a lot of that information is incorrect or it just doesn't apply to people who are starting out their business versus someone who's been in business you know seven, 10 years and has maybe figured out like some loopholes or just some workarounds. So I think there's also just a lot of misinformation on that part too, which is why, again, education is so critical, because if you know what these things do to protect your business and how they impact your business or may impact it negatively, how you can take advantage, right like if you know all of those things, you make different decisions. So I would say those are some of the things that I'm noticing just in the online business space.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, that's good to know. I definitely want to at least ask that way we can, as people are hearing it, they're probably like, oh, I've done that or okay, yeah, I think so and I do think that overall we are. It's a blessing and a curse. It's online space. It's a way like I feel like I learned so much on TikTok I'm on TikTok more than Google, like it's just, but technically, if that's not your lane, no matter what it is, it could be starting a vending machine business, like it's a little bit of everything online and you really don't know what's what, because sometimes people will say whoever's making the video will say whatever they're saying. I'm a comment girl. I'm going to the comments. And it's always a few people that's like no, that's not correct what they're saying, because my dad owns 10,. Like they're saying, you could make this amount of money with one vending machine, but really it takes about 10 to really see a profit. And you're like, ooh, because they want you to get the ebook. They like that's their hustle. So it is kind of like using that discernment to know, like, okay, I'm hearing his information, but let me and I think that's just us building that muscle of like y'all, it's okay to do our own research too. Like we can hear something, it doesn't matter who is from, but we need to start educating ourselves, like if it's terms that they're saying that we don't know, or just starting to create new habits in that way, I think. But I don't know. I'm just excited overall for what you're going to be providing soon. I think it's so necessary for everyone because, like you said, by the time you hire a lawyer, you're not starting from like basic basics. You're like all right, I already have this and that in place. I feel good about the LC or this. Okay, I'm ready for this next level of things that I want to implement.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, most definitely. And just to add to what you're saying about like people doing their own research, I think TikTok seem to have everything. Number one like oh, it's TikTok is crazy, but I think that is. You know, social media is easy to look for stuff and find it, especially in the business realm, and you don't know what's right or wrong, and so I think at that point, like you do have to go talk to that expert. So I tell people like you don't need to pay an attorney $10,000, $5,000 to have a conversation with them. A lot of attorneys have, you know, free consultations or paid consultations that are like $50, $100, you know a few hundred dollars. So it kind of depends on you know how much you, how important that information is to you, and you can certainly find an attorney. There are law schools that provide business clinics, where they have law students, you know, advising people under the supervision of licensed attorneys. Right, there's resources out there. So if you live not too far from a law school, see if they have a business clinic. Sometimes they even have family law clinics or clinics for veterans. Those are the three clinics that we had at my law school. There's legal aid programs in, sometimes, you know your chamber of commerce has legal resources. So there are ways to go and find an attorney to talk to, just like you can find an accountant or, you know, financial professional, like whoever you need to talk to if it is a vending machine person, like, book a call with them, ask your questions so that you do know, like, how to move forward versus just taking information at face value and trying to figure it out yourself right. So I just wanted to say that's available as an option.

Speaker 1:

No, and that's good to know. Like even I'm learning something and all I keep thinking about as you were talking is like you know me doing some research, getting with you and just putting together a list of what stuff that's out here that people just don't know that's out here, because I think that's what gets everything started. It's like okay, like I do have resources at my fingertips and this is I don't have to shy away from legal things, because in my mind is you know, I hope this what everyone listens to, this podcast. I hope what you're taking away is that you don't have to put down half your mortgage, like you don't have to do all this stuff just to get some information and to learn a few things and kind of get point in a direction. There are a lot of resources out here. That's what I'm taking away from this, which is a good thing. It's a good feeling of okay, like I don't have to put this off until my business is super successful just to make sure that I'm taking proper steps to protect myself, my brand. You know, some people have products. You may need some trademarks. Like you just need different things in place to make sure you can enjoy your business without looking over your shoulder, like you know something's not done correctly. So that'll keep you up at night, right?

Speaker 2:

exactly. We don't want that stress to business owners. We want to be free right, stress free.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, exactly Right, we want to make sure we're good, but thank you so much. This has been like an amazing, amazing episode. Like I'm happy I learned a lot about you. I'm sure everyone else is like, okay, I didn't know this, I didn't know that. So I'm just so appreciative of you being able to come on, share your story, share your journey and telling us what's next. But I guess, before we go, tell everyone where they can find you, how they can support, how they can maybe learn more about the program. I know you said this while I believe, but just yeah, how can we support you?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, follow me on LinkedIn. I'm heavy on LinkedIn, I love LinkedIn, so you can find me there. If you put in Liku Tiamati, I'm the only one who will pop up, so you can follow me on LinkedIn. Also on Instagram, at lawyerliku but less active at the moment as I've been heavy on LinkedIn and then you can subscribe to and I'll send you the link diamond, but subscribe to be on the waitlist for this program that I'm launching. In the fall it's in a few months, but with the wait time it's fine. It's gonna be right around the corner, so we might have an opportunity for additional beta testers. If that's something that you're interested in, then you can definitely reach out about that, but otherwise, that's the best way to stay connected with me and figure out what's going on.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. So for everyone that's listening, I will make sure to put all of this in the show notes. That way you can just click the links to her socials and for the waitlist as well. And yeah, I'm just, I'm super excited. So thank you so much for coming on. The Black Directory podcast. Thank you for having me, of course. Thank you for spending some time with us Enjoying the show. Be sure to subscribe and leave us a rating and review Until next time.

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